Boys Soccer - Rules & Regulations

Rules & Regulations

4-1-1a, b: a. The home team shall wear dark jerseys and socks (dark is defined as any color which contrasts with white), and the visiting team shall wear solid white jerseys and solid white socks. Prior to and during the game, jerseys shall be tucked into the shorts, unless manufactured to be worn outside.
b. Both socks shall be the same color, with the home team wearing socks of a single dominant color, but not necessarily the color of the jersey and the visiting team wearing solid white sock. If tape or a similar material (stays/ straps) is applied externally to the socks, it must be of similar color as that part of the sock to which it is applied.

Rationale: This change allows home teams to wear the school-colored jerseys at home. The change would provide the opportunity for teams to use an alternative color uniform for "special" events, if approved by the state association.

4-1-1d, e: d. If visible apparel is worn under the jersey and/or shorts, it shall be of similar length for an individual and a solid liked-color for the team.

Rationale: The previous rule caused financial hardships for some players and schools. The rule allows for the purchase of one set of cold-weather undergarments per player.

4-2-10 (NEW): In addition to the above permitted uses, state associations may on an individual basis permit a player to participate while wearing a head covering if it meets the following criteria:

1. For medical or cosmetic reasons – In the event a participant is required by a licensed medical physician to cover his/her head with a covering or wrap, the physician’s statement is required before the state association can approve a covering or wrap which is not abrasive, hard or dangerous to any other player and which is attached in such a way it is highly unlikely that it will come off during play.
2. For religious reasons – In the event there is documented evidence provided to the state association that a participant may not expose his/her uncovered head, the state association may approve a covering or wrap which is not abrasive, hard or dangerous to any other player and which is attached in such a way it is highly unlikely to come off during play.

Rationale: The addition of this exception allows for the participation of students who for religious reasons must maintain a covered head in all situations. The same is true for the student who for medical or cosmetic reasons needs to cover the head.

8-1-2: At the moment of the kickoff, all players, except the player taking the kickoff, shall be in their team's half of the field. Players opposing the kicker shall be at least 10 yards from the ball until it is kicked.

Rationale: This 2017 rule change allowing the kickoff to be taken in any direction has created difficulty for the player taking the kick to easily kickoff into his/her own half of the field without physically being in the opponent’s half of the field. This addition to the rule would permit only the player taking the kickoff to be in the opponent’s half of the field, in order to take the kickoff.

11-1-4: A Player is offside and penalized if, at the time the ball touches or is played by a teammate, the player, in an offside position, becomes involved in active play by:

  • a. interfering with play or with an opponent or;
  • b. seeks to gain an advantage by being in that position.

A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent, who deliberately plays the ball (except from a deliberate save), is not considered to have gained an advantage. Indirect free kick at the spot of the infraction (even in own half), subject to the provisions in P 13.1.3

Rationale: This change better articulates the difference between being in an offside position and an offside violation. It also places the penalty language in a more logical place within the rule.

12-8-1f, 15 (NEW): 1. A player, coach or bench personnel shall be cautioned (yellow card) for:

f. unsporting conduct, including, but not limited to: 15. A player who commits an offense against an opponent within his/her team penalty area which denies an opponent an obvious goal-scoring opportunity and the referee awards a penalty kick, if the offense was an attempt to play the ball. 12-8-2d3, 4 2. A player, coach or bench personnel shall be disqualified (red card) for: (NEW) d. committing serious foul play: 3. a player commits a foul, outside the penalty area, attempting to deny an obvious goal-scoring opportunity, and the goal is not scored; or 4. a player commits a foul, inside the penalty area, while not attempting to play the ball, and the goal is not scored.

Rationale: This change addresses the issues of denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity (DOGSO) that occur in the game that places a player and team in double jeopardy when applying a penalty.

13-2-1j (NEW): ART. 1 . . . Direct free kicks are awarded and taken from the point of the infraction (Except as in 13-1-3 and 14-1-1):

j. if a player, coach, or bench personnel enters or leaves the field of play without permission of an official and interferes with play or an official (12-8-1).

Rationale: This change emphasizes the importance of proper decorum and behavior from the benches.

13-2-3: ART. 3 . . . The following indirect free kicks are taken from where the ball was when the referee stopped play: (Subject to restrictions in 13-1-3 and 13-1-4.)

a. if a player, coach or bench personnel enters or leaves the field of play without permission of an official and does not interfere with play or an official (12-8-1);

Rationale: This change maintains a focus on the proper decorum and behavior of the benches.

18-1-g (NEW): A deliberate act is one in which a player chooses to act, regardless of the outcome of that action. This deliberate act is neither reaction nor reflex. A deliberate action may result in the opponent benefiting from the action (e.g., a deliberate, but misplayed ball that goes directly to an opponent). A reaction or reflex may result in that player benefiting from the action (e.g., a ball inadvertently contacting the arm and falling directly to the player's feet).

Rationale: This definition provides guidance for interpretation of rules that contain the word deliberate or phrase deliberate act.

 

Major Editorial Changes

4-2-4: Clarifies a religious medal or other religious items must be taped to the body

 

Points of Emphasis

  1. Denying an Obvious Goal-Scoring Opportunity
  2. Excessive Player Substitutions
  3. Referee Mechanics for Indirect Free Kicks

If multiple practies in a day are utilized (long day), they may not be scheduled on consecutive days. Practices are limited to alternating Short Days and Long Days.


1.  Short Day

(a) Maximum practice is 3 hours of physical activity plus a 30-minute recovery period.

(b) A 30-minute recovery period (rest in a cool environment and hydrate) must occur no later than 2 hours into practice. 

(c) Unrestricted and unlimited access to water throughout physical activity is strongly encouraged.


2. Long Day 

(a) Maximum of one practice is 3 hours of physical activity plus a 30-minute recovery period. 

(b) A 30-minute recovery period (rest in a cool environment and hydrate) must occur no later than 2 hours into practice.

(c) Minimum of a 3-hour break without physical exertion, in a cool environment, with rehydration before the second practice that day. 

(d) The longer practice, which is limited to 3 hours of physical activity plus a 30-minute recovery period, may be at any time during the day. When combined with an additional practice, there must be a 3-hour break between. 

(e) Maximum additional practice is 1.5 hours. 

(f) Unrestricted and unlimited access to water throughout physical activity is strongly encouraged.


3.  After ten (10) practices to the end of the season:

(a) Only one practice allowed per day.

(b) Maximum practice is 2.5 hours.

(c) A 30-minute recovery period is not required.

(d) Monitor weather and heat conditions and adjust appropriately.

(e) Unlimited access to water and hydration should be available.


Click on the link below to view the 2018-19 NISOA rules video.

Watch NISOA Video

Printable Version -- Please print and place in your rules book for future reference.



Soft or Padded Headgear in Non-Helmeted Sports Position Statement 

National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) 

Sports Medicine Advisory Committee (SMAC) 


The NFHS SMAC has developed the following position statement regarding soft or padded headgear products in non-helmeted sports: 

The NFHS does not consider soft or padded headgear products as effective equipment in preventing a concussion in non-helmeted sports. As explained below, soft or padded headgear products may be worn in non-helmeted sports that allow for such optional equipment, but the intent of that equipment should be for reasons other than concussion prevention. Valid scientific research should be pursued to more definitively determine evidence-based efficacy regarding using such products to decrease the incidence of concussion. However, no currently available soft or padded headgear can prevent a concussion. 


The NFHS recommends caution in using soft or padded headgear devices to permit medical clearance of a student-athlete, if he or she would otherwise not be medically cleared to participate in sports. Currently, wearing such headgear as a condition to play in order to prevent another concussion is not scientifically or medically supported; therefore, a medical waiver for wearing this type of equipment in the case of hastening return to play after a concussion is inappropriate. However, this equipment may be used to cover lacerations and sutures, if these devices are deemed appropriate within the sport’s playing rules. 


Current design and recommended use of these devices do not address the proposed mechanism of concussive injury, that being acceleration, deceleration and rotational forces acting on the brain. Schools should refer to equipment standards from the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), and the Hockey Equipment Certification Council, Inc. (HECC), when considering protective equipment for student-athletes, and monitor that the equipment is being used for mitigating the risk of injuries for which the equipment is designed. 

When considering the use of optional soft or padded headgear products in non-helmeted sports, athletes and coaches should take the time to read the qualifying statements provided with such products that address specific limitations, particularly those related to preventing serious head injuries. Wearing such products may provide a false sense of security in concussion protection to student-athletes, coaches and parents. Moreover, a false sense of security in concussion protection may increase the likelihood that players, coaches and parents will consider a given medical condition to be adequately addressed and may cause them to place less importance upon avoiding head impact, reporting concussion symptoms and recovering fully before returning to play. 


The NFHS SMAC will continue to monitor developments in soft and padded headgear and will consider adjustments to its position should valid scientific and clinical evidence arise. 


Approved June 2013 


DISCLAIMER – NFHS Position Statements and Guidelines 


The NFHS regularly distributes position statements and guidelines to promote public awareness of certain health and safety-related issues. Such information is neither exhaustive nor necessarily applicable to all circumstances or individuals, and is no substitute for consultation with appropriate health-care professionals. Statutes, codes or environmental conditions may be relevant. NFHS position statements or guidelines should be considered in conjunction with other pertinent materials when taking action or planning care. The NFHS reserves the right to rescind or modify any such document at any time. 


A proposal to create administrative rules related to soccer goals has been sent by the Safety and Building Division of the Wisconsin Department of Commerce to the state legislature for assembly and senate committee review.

The proposal to create administrative code chapter Comm 9, Movable Soccer Goals, is in response to 2009 Wisconsin Act 390, s. 167.21, Wis. Stats., which calls for rules to ensure that movable soccer goals are properly anchored or secured to reduce the possibility of goals tipping over or being pull down and resulting in injuries or fatalities.


The proposals developed reflect the Guidelines for Movable Soccer Goal Safety from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The rules would apply to new and existing goals located at public places, such as parks, as well as those located at private schools or private recreational facilities. Enforcement would be via a complaint to Safety and Buildings Division staff, but the expectation is that owners of movable soccer goals will voluntarily adhere to the rules once the information is made public.


There was previously a public hearing on the rules and the public can contact the legislative committees if additional input is desired. The rules would possibly be effective July 1, 2011.


Here is a like to the code proposal documents, commerce.wi.gov/SB/SB-CodeDevelopment.html


For additional information, contact Jim Quast, Safety and Buildings Division Program Manager, jim.quast@wi.gov, 608-266-9292.

2012 Shinguard Requirement

Beginning with the 2012 fall season, the NOCSAE seal and height range shall be permanently marked on the front of the shinguard.  Equipment shall not be modified from its original manufactured state and shall be worn in the manner the manufacturer intended it to be worn.  

 

Hosting a “Pink” Event

BALL: May be pink & white or pink white and another color.  Ball must meet all specifications (Rule 2-2) and have NFHS authenticating mark.

UNIFORM: The HOME team may wear pink.  Uniforms must meet NFHS requirements (Rule 44-1) including legally positioned numbers (Rule 4-1-h-1). No advertising is allowed on the uniform. “Kick Pink” or other trademark phrases are not allowed since they are considered advertising.

If the uniform tops are t-shirts which have been donated, the athletes must either pay for them or return them to the school when the event is finished.  Failure to follow this requirement jeopardizes the amateur status of the athletes.

SHOES: Are not covered by NFHS/WIAA rules so may be pink.

SWEATBAND AND HAIR CONTROL DEVICES: Provided they adhere to Rule 4-2-4 may be pink.

FUND RAISING: See the following from the Eligibility Q & A  Q: I am a high school girls basketball coach. Our girls basketball team would like to hold a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society this coming season and I just want to check that how we plan on doing it will not violate any WIAA rules. Here’s our plan, our fundraiser will be based on how many free throws the girls varsity team makes during the season.  Each player will solicit funds or donations based on the free throw made. People could donate a lump sum or could donate X amount per free throw made. As an example last year we made 205 free throws. If you pledged a dollar per free throw, you would be donating $205 at year end for the team to donate to the American Cancer Society. No funds are kept by or for the team. A: While we appreciate the causes which our schools and athletes support, I recommend that you find a different method to raise funds. The Board of Control has made it clear that fundraisers connected to performance in competition are not allowed. Both from the sportsmanship perspective as well as from the “paid to perform” and or gaming/gambling end of things, it is not a good idea and not allowed. Your plan would be allowed in a practice setting.

OFFICIALS: May participate by using a ping whistle or wearing a pink wristband. Wearing a pink officiating uniform ,shoes, or socks.


Tape on Socks

On the left -- Legal socks ... white socks with white tape

On the right - Illegal socks - white socks with black tape

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Wisconsin Interscholastic
Athletic Association
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